Digital Trends showing Mobile as de-facto for content consumption

In the past half a decade, various consumer & media researches have shown a downward trend for Digital Consumption on PC, and it is no longer a breaking news for the hardware manufacturers around the globe.

Mobile is de-facto for interactive content consumption

When it comes to digital consumption for content, Smartphones & Tablets have become the de-facto device for all audience segments and hence the most preferred platform of engagement for the advertisers. In terms of media consumption, tablets are perfect devices.

More portable than a laptop and yet larger than the minuscule screens of phones, tablets are easy on the eyes and allow you to really get immersed in the content while still being able to take on the go.

In the past 12 months, Millennial Media digital trend reports that the number of internet users grew by 4% to 201 million users. However, mobile-only users grew nine times faster during the same time period while desktop users decreased by 45%.

Here’s what Millennial Media found out:

There were few content categories that were consumed on Mobile Devices more than the Desktop Computers:

  • Streaming Radio: Mobile = 95% (79% smartphones and 16% tablets) and Desktop = 5%
  • Games: Mobile = 85% (79% smartphones and 6% tablets) and Desktop = 15%
  • Social Media: Mobile = 72% (61% smartphones and 11% tablets) and Desktop = 28%
  • Weather: Mobile = 70% (61% smartphones and 9% tablets) and Desktop = 31%
  • Retail: Mobile = 53% (39% smartphones and 14% tablets) and Desktop = 47%

Content Categories Consumed on Desktop Computers More than Mobile Devices:

  • News: Mobile = 45% (39% smartphones and 6% tablets) and Desktop = 55%
  • Sports: Mobile = 44% (38% smartphones and 6% tablets) and Desktop = 56%
  • Food: Mobile = 42% (27% smartphones and 15% tablets) and Desktop = 58%
  • Business/Finance: Mobile = 38% (36% smartphones and 2% tablets) and Desktop = 62%
  • TV: Mobile = 33% (22% smartphones and 11% tablets) and Desktop = 67%
  • Travel: Mobile = 32% (21% smartphones and 11% tablets) and Desktop = 68%
  • Auto: Mobile = 24% (19% smartphones and 5% tablets) and Desktop = 76%
  • B2B: Mobile = 20% (12% smartphones and 8% tablets) and Desktop = 80%

Content Categories Consumed Equally on Mobile Devices and Desktop Computers:

  • Health: Mobile = 50% (45% smartphones and 5% tablets) and Desktop = 50%

Digital Trends : App consumption versus mobile web

  • Time spent consuming content on mobile devices is overwhelmingly huge through mobile apps, according to comScore data.

According to Mediabriefing:

2014 was the first year in which more time online was spent in mobile apps than on desktops, and mobile web barely got a look-in. That’s not the case for news consumption, but publishers should take note of those proportions are underscored by an increase in the time spent in-app for news applications, which analysts Localytics showed rose 14 percent over the past year.

While mobile responsive websites are likely to remain a priority for publishers, people are increasingly choosing to consume news in-app on their mobile devices, more and more publishers would be looking to  build their native app in 2015.

Popular categories in Apps belong to leading news content publishers

According to statista, business, lifestyle and entertainment categories are in the top app categories of 2014. If you are a Television Producer or a Programming head of any popular TV Channel, you have every reason to go ecstatic seeing the possibilities that Smartphones & Tablet can offer.

What this also meant is that content producers can no longer create & distribute their content from a myopic standpoint as it is now being viewed across multiple devices.

Mobile doing better than Tablets in e-commerce conversions

According to recent report on Marketing Land:

Device trends held steady, with mobile devices (tablets and smartphones) accounting for 42 percent of traffic and PCs driving 58 percent of shopping traffic. Smartphones continued to lead tablets, driving 24 percent of traffic compared to 18 percent for tablets.

PCs accounted for 73 percent of orders in week two of December, tablets drove 12 percent and smartphones drove 15 percent of orders.

Digital Trends : Publisher priorities in 2015

Recently, Jeff Jarvis pointed out we’re all mobile now, since the ubiquity and interconnectivity of tech means we’re essentially always connected to the internet and whatever information we need. He argues this means publishers need to focus less on delivering content tailored to individual platforms and more on the context (location, time etc.) of its audience at a given time.

All these stats point in the same direction, with tablets on the rise, consumer is shouting out loud to the media companies & brands to create responsive web experience & highly engaging content that is available across devices.

‘Social Media phase of the internet’ has ended long ago | Opinion

Fred-Wilson-Social-Media

In his closing comments of 2014, leading New York City-based venture capitalist and blogger Fred Wilson says “the social media phase of the Internet ended” in 2014.

A lot of us would dismiss this statement immediately. And why not? After all there are 1.8 billion internet users who are accessing various social networks. But despite such a mammoth ecosystem, social is losing its sheen continuously.

In his blog article, Wilson thinks messaging and mobile have moved into the enterprise in a big way in 2014. What is also interesting to note, Social is continuously losing VC’s attention in their investment radar.

According to Carmel DeAmicis, Facebook’s IPO was a bust, the market has gotten saturated, and there’s perpetual questions over mobile monetization of social platforms.

The market has gotten saturated, some people are tired of social, and there’s a cultural pushback ranging from mocking social media job titles to compiling lists of how social is ruining your life. How many networks can a person possibly join?

Here is Wilson’s complete list of what happened in 2014:

1/ the social media phase of the Internet ended. this may have happened a few years ago actually but i felt it strongly this year. entrepreneurs and developers still build social applications. we still use them. but there isn’t much innovation here anymore. the big platforms are mature. their place is secure.

2/ messaging is the new social media. this may be part of what is going on in 1/. families use whatsapp groups instead of facebook. kids use snapchat instead of instagram. facebook’s acquisition of whatsapp in february of this year was the transaction that defined this trend.

3/ the “sharing economy” was outed as the “rental economy.” nobody is sharing anything. people are making money, plain and simple. technology has made renting things (even in real time) as simple as it made buying things a decade ago. Uber and Airbnb are the big winners in this category but there are and will be others.

4/ the capital markets have moved to the internet. we call it crowdfunding but what is really going on is raising money is a great application of a global platform that connects billions of people in real time. i don’t know the total amount of capital that was raised on the internet across all sectors (equity, debt, creative projects, charity, helping a person in need, real estate, energy, etc, etc) in 2014 but i am sure it is in the tens of billions.

5/ mobile OS has become a stable duopoly around the world. but android is splintering into google android and non google android and that may lead to new large players. 2014 was a big coming out party for xiaomi. if and when they come to the US, things will get interesting. they are the new (and better) samsung.

6/ mobile and messaging has started to impact the enterprise. slack is the poster boy for this trend in 2014.

7/ youtube became a monster. it always has been. but in 2014 youtube emerged as the place for entertainment consumption for anyone under 16. and these youngsters are going to grow up quickly. watching The Interview on YouTube was a fitting end to an amazing year for the king (and queen and joker too) of Internet video.

8/ we finally got rid of files. dropbox, google drive, soundcloud, spotify, netflix, hbogo, youtube, wattpad, kindle, and a host of other cloud based services finally killed off three letter filenames like mp3, mov, doc and xls. spending a week in the caribbean with young adults and bad internet was the tell on this one for me. they don’t even have mp3s on their iphones anymore!

9/ the net neutrality debate emerged as a national political issue with Obama’s endorsement of Title II regulation of the last mile of the internet. it is unclear how this issue will resolve itself but the public has spoken loudly and clearly and politicians understand that the internet needs to remain open for innovation and we can’t let the monopoly carriers and cable companies mess that up.

10/ cyber warfare, cybercrime, cyber hacking, and cybersecurity was by far the dominant theme of 2014. if anyone had their head in the sand on this one before this year, they don’t anymore. this is our new normal. the US takedown of North Korea’s internet last week, and the state department official’s comment that “i guess accidents can happen” is a moment to remember as we head out of 2014 and into our future.

Digital Trends in Mobile App Marketing for 2014

With the pace at which connected tech is evolving, very soon Smart TVs, integrating television along with the power Internet technologies and social media, will replace Television.

Having said that, India is still world’s third largest television market in the world with a combined viewership of 415 million. Millions of these potential Consumers still consuming majority of their daily entertainment & infotainment through television broadcast on a daily basis.

Continue reading “Digital Trends in Mobile App Marketing for 2014”

RIP Reports – Worldwide Failed startup trends

failed-start-up-business

Let me start this post by making a simple statement. By the time I would finish writing this post, according to latest startup trends, around 11,000 new startup business would get added to this world. Must be wondering how I found that number?

According to a massive research startup study done by Global Entrepreneurship Monitor– around 472 million entrepreneurs worldwide attempting to start 305 million companies, approximately 100 million new businesses (or one third) will open each year around the world.

reynoldsInterestingly, Dr. Paul D. Reynolds, Director, Research Institute, Global Entrepreneurship Center also says,

” The developing countries of Asia and Latin America are far ahead of Europe in starting new businesses, according to a recent survey of global entrepreneurial activity. But few start-ups have the potential to make an impact on jobs and growth, and a negligible number benefit from venture capital, with the vast majority reliant on informal funding. The 2002 annual survey by the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) was carried out across 37 countries representing 92% of world GDP. It finds that 286 million people, 12% of the workforce in these countries, are engaged in starting or running a new business, implying a global figure of about 460 million. “We were quite shocked by how high the index is in the developing countries,” admits Paul Reynolds, the GEM project co-ordinator. “Only now do we have a fuller understanding that half of the people in many developing countries are doing it out of necessity because they cannot find work, and that is what drives the rate up so high.” 

Every now and then we keep seeing these lists on buzzfeed or twitter around “17 coolest startups that can change your life” (like this one) and I’m sure a lot of you feel wow about the whole concept of startups. But let me spoil your party, most of these startup companies typically die around ~20 months after their last financing round and after having raised $1.3 million.

Failed startup Companies By Sectorfinal

  • 55% of failed startups raised $1M or less, and almost 70% companies died having raised less than $5M overall.  Not a big surprise. Companies at the earliest stages are the most vulnerable due to limited financial runway, immature products and businesses and general uncertainty about whether the market needs what they’ve built.
  • In each year since 2010, 70% of all dead tech companies have been in the internet sector. This is hardly a surprise as within tech, a majority of funding and deals has gone to the internet sector and so it would follow that the sector would have the largest proportion of dead companies.  The % of companies dying within the internet sector has stayed relatively range bound over the last several years as well.

On his many failed experiments, Thomas Edison once said,

I have learned fifty thousand ways it cannot be done and therefore I am fifty thousand times nearer the final successful experiment.

Well, it seems a lot of our modern day entrepreneurs have taken that quote to their hearts.

The rate at which startups are failing is quite incredible. Media, quite literally has made the whole idea of startup funeral extremely cool. It is hilarious (even bizarre) that the failed entrepreneur wants to grab the same attention like a war hero. The irony however, is that the media (especially the social media) is happily obliging to do it. Public post mortem of a failed Startup seems to have become a general startup trends in the business circles. A lot of professionals find it intellectually stimulating to visit the #RIP sessions of the startups. 

Dead_startup_Funding_Raised

 

Dead_startups_Time_Since_Funding

According to CB Insights report:

  • While the dead companies on our list raised $11.3M on average, the median funding raised which is a better measure in this case was $1.3M.
  • the average company dies ~20 months from its last funding round in the absence of additional funding or acquirers.

But the question which is bugging me continuously is,

Why do so many startups fail? 

Typically, there could be hundreds of possible reasons for a failed startup like:

  • lack of strong value proposition
  • high risk low return business model
  • longer sales cycles
  • non scalable, non profitable business

and many, many more. You could actually read about reasons of startup failure all around the web.

startups_failed_industry_Rankings

 

According to CB Insights startup trends,

“Death is not specific to a particular type of sector or industry. In fact, the companies on our dataset represent a fairly diverse set of subindustries.”

Interestingly, in the following Ted Talk, Clara Brenner, Co-Founder of Tumml talked about why a lot of social startups face such high failure rates.

She has mentioned about the importance of seed funding & how it needs to be utilized in a startup.

Also, the relevance of Impact Investors to Urban Innovation startups can be co-related with the importance of finding the right investor that matches your company’s vision. 

Finding a right investor for a startup is nothing short of doing matrimony match making. A lot of the startups fail even after getting several rounds of seed funding because the investor does not show enough trust or faith in the founding team’s vision.