Google adds forecasting to its Adwords display planner

In a Google+ post, the AdWords team announced the update to AdWords Display Planner, writing the enhancements now help “forecast how many clicks and impressions are available in your bid and budget range — based on current auction data.

The estimates rely on current auction data and show projections over time. The Display Planner will also show how much of the budget entered is likely to be spent with the placements selected.

For those who use Adwords frequently, to see this forecast data, select “Get performance forecasts for your targeting” from the Display Planner start page.

The Google Smart Goals program allows marketers to define AdWords conversions and then optimise campaigns based on that data.

In a separate blog post, Google software engineer Abishek Sethi and product manager Joan Arensman wrote,

To generate Smart Goals, we apply machine learning across thousands of websites that use Google Analytics and have opted in to share anonymised conversion data. From this information, we can distill dozens of key factors that correlate with likelihood to convert: things like session duration, pages per session, location, device and browser.

A great news for everyone in the digital media planning fraternity as this will help you plan campaigns better by providing a clearer picture of the performance you can expect.

Digital Trends : 14% CMOs anticipate mobile spends to rise upto 50%

The Interactive Advertising Bureau’s (IAB) recently released “Marketer Perceptions of Mobile Advertising” report, which surveyed more than 200 marketers, found that more than three-quarters of marketers believe that programmatic mobile is important, or at least somewhat important.

Surprisingly, only 27 percent of the marketers surveyed had actually purchased mobile ads programmatically.

The good news for the programmatic industry, and for marketers as a whole, is that the technical hurdles that once prevented programmatic targeting on mobile are now largely a thing of the past.

A variety of solutions have emerged to solve mobile’s cookie problem: client log-in, app SDKs (Software Development Kits), and mobile Web behavioural data to name a few. Tie a shiny bow around all of that with geo-location, and we’ve begun to master mobile.

Here are some of the key digital trends from the report:

  • Marketers expect that their spending on mobile advertising will increase over the next two years: 14% anticipate it will rise by more than 50% while 57% expect it to rise by less than 50%. 
  • About one-third of mobile advertising spend is substitution from other channels, with print media hit hardest (58%), followed by PC digital and TV. 
  • Marketers in our 2014 survey show a high level of satisfaction with the results of their mobile marketing activities. The majority is either satisfied (50%) or fairly satisfied (37%) while a further 8% completely satisfied.
  • Marketers show a strong interest in mobile programmatic, as 41% agree that it will help them reach target audiences. However, relatively few are actually buying mobile inventory programmatically today: 18% via private exchanges and 17% via open exchanges. 
  • Marketer uneasiness over potential data privacy issues is pronounced. 37% of respondents in 2014 cited privacy as a very important issue compared to 22% in 2013.

Ranking for Mobile Advertising Inventory

  • Mobile websites continue to take a central role in mobile advertising, with 22% of respondents ranking these as the most important type of inventory for their mobile campaigns.
  • Sixteen percent of respondents prioritised mobile search as most important for their mobile campaigns.
  • Mobile optimised social media campaign is gaining its popularity slowly and steadily, with 14% audience placed their bets on it.
  • Mobile rich media is losing its popularity due to diversity in type and size of devices in the market.

Here is a short summary presentation of the 2015 IAB Mobile Advertising Report:


Ad Viewability – a boon or bane for advertisers?

According to a recent comScore study, 54% of online display ads weren’t seen by anyone, owing to various factors including technical glitches, user habits, and even fraud. For advertisers, that’s a lot of money down the drain. And rightly so, I mean after all we are talking about hard marketing dollars. Some conventional media people might argue that 100% ad viewability is a myth, and honestly, they are not wrong but the advertiser also has a strong point when they ask for maximising the viewable impressions in any campaign.
Let’s open this discussion a bit further. 
Terms like ad viewability brings a set of common problems along with it, most common is what we call in digital as Measurability (or “obsessive measurability”). It is true that digital has given the power & tools to measure each & every nano second of any marketing campaign but at the expense of confusing & cluttering the environment around us. More detailed & in-depth the metric goes, more the number of definitions for the same metric that you would see. Each publisher would come up with their own “convenient” definition of same metric in their reporting.
For any advertiser, finding the correct industry benchmark is always a challenge. For instance, something which is as debatable as Video Completion rate would become a hurdle for agencies & publishers in driving stronger revenue volume / advertiser in the coming years.
Even if the overall mobile & display revenues are seeing a major upswing worldwide, It would be hard to imagine that advertiser would surrender their stand on the key reporting metrics when it comes to Mobile Display or Mobile Video. 
Most importantly, in order to make the client ecosystem more responsive towards new age advertising, agencies & vendors have to sit together along with the bodies like IAB (Interactive Advertising Bureau) & arrive at common marketing friendly reporting metrics without which it would extremely difficult to win the trust of the advertiser.

To understand this further, watch the below video by Integral Ad Science:

A few months back, the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) and the Media Rating Council issued the first viewability standards for online ads. A video ad is viewable if half its pixels appear on the viewer’s screen for two continuous seconds, the standard says.

While that standard seems awfully low, the IAB says that 100 percent viewability isn’t possible at this time. The best that ad buyers should hope for is 70 percent. Good news: Only 30 percent of your paid ads won’t be seen—for the time-being, anyway

The IAB has just released a position paper on viewability calling 2015 a year of transition. Full viewability isn’t currently feasible, the paper says, but we’re getting there. Problems such as different ad units, browsers, ad placements, vendors, and measurement systems prevent 100 percent viewability, but the industry can solve those issues by working together, it says.

You can read the complete article on IAB guidelines for ad viewability here